Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts.
It’s been well known that most Medicare Cost plans in Minnesota would be expiring in 2019. Why are Medicare Cost Plans in Minnesota expiring? The simplest answer is, to simplify the options available to you, the consumer. Although some seniors will be able to keep their Cost Plan, Minnesotans in about 66 counties will have to choose either a Medigap Plan or a Medicare Advantage plan this year to replace their Cost Plan.
Medicare offers healthcare coverage to Minnesota residents age 65 or older, or to those Minnesota residents that suffer from certain medical disabilities. In 2016, 882,000 people are enrolled in Medicare in Minnesota, accounting for 16.2% of the population in Minnesota. In 2009 an average of about $8,941 was spent per Medicare enrollee in Minnesota, approximately 13.74% lower than the national average of $10,365. Between 2015 to 2030 the number of seniors in Minnesota is expected to rise by an estimated 54.07% according to calculations based off of the 2000 Census. Thus, the number of Medicare enrollees in the state is also projected to grow.
MA plans feature a network of doctors and hospitals that enrollees must use to get the maximum payment, whereas supplements tend to provide access to a broader set of health care providers, said Shawnee Christenson, an insurance agent with Crosstown Insurance in New Hope. While that might sound good to beneficiaries, supplements can come with significantly higher premiums, Christenson said.
Minnesota had some of the country’s most generous eligibility guidelines for Medicaid prior to expansion under the ACA (up to 100 percent of poverty for adults with dependent children, and up to 75 percent of poverty for those without dependent children). And the state also became the first in the nation to establish a Basic Health Program under the ACA.
As an alternative to obtaining Original Medicare coverage directly from the government, you may want to consider Medicare Advantage (sometimes referred to as Medicare Part C) in Minnesota. Medicare Advantage plans are offered by private insurance companies that contract with CMS to provide all Original Medicare benefits except hospice care, which is paid by Medicare Part A. Many Medicare Advantage plans also include extra benefits such as routine dental and vision care.
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