In the fall of 2013, prior to the launch of the ACA’s exchanges, Minnesota’s total Medicaid/CHIP enrollment stood at 873,040. There were 144,481 new Medicaid enrollments through MNsure, the state-run exchange, from October 2013 through April 2014, and total enrollment in Minnesota’s Medicaid program had grown to 1,066,787 by August 2014, an increase of more than 22 percent over the enrollment total prior to October 2013. Many of these enrollees were already eligible prior to 2014, but were not aware of their eligibility.
Without the flexibility of Medicare Cost plans, state residents might turn to an Basic or an Extended Basic Supplement plan in Minnesota. Insurers may charge more for a Minnesota Medigap plan, but, many times they have more thorough coverage. Minnesota Medigap plans will pay for almost all covered services, so some recipients may end up saving money anyway.
We provide our Q1Medicare.com site for educational purposes and strive to present unbiased and accurate information. However, Q1Medicare is not intended as a substitute for your lawyer, doctor, healthcare provider, financial advisor, or pharmacist. For more information on your Medicare coverage, please be sure to seek legal, medical, pharmaceutical, or financial advice from a licensed professional or telephone Medicare at 1-800-633-4227.
You’re eligible for Medicare if you’re age 65 or older, receiving disability benefits, or have certain conditions, like end-stage renal disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease). You must be either a United States citizen or a legal permanent resident of at least five years. In some instances, you may not have to take any action in order to enroll. This may happen if you’re turning 65 and already receive Social Security benefits or Railroad Retirement Board benefits.
A Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan (PDP) can help pay your prescription drug costs. Designed to work alongside Original Medicare coverage, Medicare Prescription Drug Plans are available from private insurance companies approved by Medicare and doing business in Minnesota. You can also enroll in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan if you enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that does not include Part D prescription drug coverage in its benefits.
For some services, you pay a deductible, copayment, or co-insurance before Medicare begins to help pay for that service. For Medicare Part B or Part D, or for Medicare Advantage or Medicare Cost plans, you may have to pay a monthly premium, unless you qualify to get help paying for your Medicare premiums, copayments, and deductibles through MA, a Medicare Savings Program (MSP), or the Low Income Subsidy (LIS).

People who qualify for both Medicare and MA coverage are called “dual eligibles.” Most dual eligibles do not have to pay Medicare premiums, because either MA pays them or because the person also qualifies for a Medicare Savings Program (MSP). MA, including Medical Assistance for Employed Persons with Disabilities (MA-EPD), may also help pay for Medicare co-insurance and deductibles, as well as some services Medicare doesn’t cover. That’s why you shouldn’t decline Medicare Parts B or D if you also qualify for MA.
In all but three states, Medigap plans are standardized under federal rules. But Minnesota is one of three states that have federal waivers that allow the state to do its own Medigap standardization. So instead of the ten Medigap plans (A through N) that are marketed in most states, Minnesota Medigap plans include Basic, Basic with riders, Extended Basic, and Medigap plans F, K, L, M, and N. There are also Medicare Select Medigap plans in Minnesota, just as there are in other states.
This website and its contents are for informational purposes only. Nothing on the website should ever be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult with your medical provider regarding diagnosis or treatment for a health condition, including decisions about the correct medication for your condition, as well as prior to undertaking any specific exercise or dietary routine.
As of 2018, there were 370,000 Medicare Cost plan enrollees in Minnesota, but most of them had to switch to new plans (either Medicare Advantage or Original Medicare) for 2019. This is described in more detail below, but Minnesota’s enrollment in private Medicare plans could end up fluctuating significantly for 2019, depending on how many of those enrollees opted to have coverage under Original Medicare versus Medicare Advantage. 

For some services, you pay a deductible, copayment, or co-insurance before Medicare begins to help pay for that service. For Medicare Part B or Part D, or for Medicare Advantage or Medicare Cost plans, you may have to pay a monthly premium, unless you qualify to get help paying for your Medicare premiums, copayments, and deductibles through MA, a Medicare Savings Program (MSP), or the Low Income Subsidy (LIS).
The program for Qualified Individuals (QI) also pays for Part B premiums, though the application approval and benefits are on a “first come, first served” basis. This is sometimes due to limited funding. For an individual to qualify for the QI program, their income must be less than $1,386 a month. The combined income limit for a married couple is $1,872.
If you believe you are eligible for medical assistance benefits, you can begin the process of applying for Medicaid at any time. There are number of simple Medicaid application methods currently available in Minnesota; individuals and families are free to choose any of the methods to apply. It may take up to a month to be approved. You can learn about coverage and costs, eligibility, and all of the application options on our site. Please feel free to review the comprehensive information we have provided.
If you don’t want Medicare Advantage, think about a Medigap policy (Medicare Supplement Insurance). If you get Original Medicare, you can pay an extra monthly premium to get a private Medigap policy that covers some of the expenses that Medicare Parts A and B won’t cover, such as co-insurance, copayments, and deductibles. Medigap policies do not cover prescription drugs (you need Part D for that). Learn more about Medigap policies or find one in your area.
Minnesota is one of just three states in the country (Massachusetts and Wisconsin are the others) that offers its own version of Medicare Supplement insurance. Minnesota has two plans available: the Minnesota Basic Plan and the Minnesota Extended Basic Plan. In  most other states, up to 10 types of standardized plans are available. Medicare Supplement plans are also known as Medigap policies and may help pay Original Medicare out-of-pocket costs, such as copayments and deductibles.

The most significant change to the Medicare program, since its enactment in 1965, began on Jan. 1, 2006. Medicare now has a prescription drug benefit (Medicare Part D). In the fall of each year, all Minnesotans with Medicare receive information about the Medicare Part D program and the Annual Open Enrollment Period for Medicare Part D and Medicare Advantage plans. Agencies, organizations and people that work with Minnesotans with Medicare will want to be kept apprised of the latest Part D information and its effect on Minnesotans with Medicare.
Medicare offers healthcare coverage to Minnesota residents age 65 or older, or to those Minnesota residents that suffer from certain medical disabilities. In 2016, 882,000 people are enrolled in Medicare in Minnesota, accounting for 16.2% of the population in Minnesota. In 2009 an average of about $8,941 was spent per Medicare enrollee in Minnesota, approximately 13.74% lower than the national average of $10,365. Between 2015 to 2030 the number of seniors in Minnesota is expected to rise by an estimated 54.07% according to calculations based off of the 2000 Census. Thus, the number of Medicare enrollees in the state is also projected to grow.
How much does Medicaid cost in Minnesota? Full Medicaid coverage is granted to certain qualified patients, while others may be required to pay fees in the forms of deductibles or co-pays for certain Medicaid services. And, while what is covered by Medicaid means little-to-no-cost for beneficiaries, there are some medical services that are considered what is not covered by Medicaid in MN. How much is Medicaid when a health service is not handled by the government? Medicaid cost estimates vary depending on the patient and types of Medicaid insurance… Read More

In states with lots of rural areas, like Minnesota, Medicare Cost plans tend to be more popular because they offer more flexibility than an HMO. If a plan member gets services inside of the network of Medicare Cost Plans, they work the same way that an HMO works. If the plan member decides to visit a non-network medical provider, Medicare Cost Plans will cover those services the same way that Original Medicare Part A and Part B do. Typically, a Medicare Advantage HMO won’t cover non-emergency services outside of the network at all.


A Special Needs Plan is a type of Medicare Advantage plan limited to people with certain chronic conditions and  other specific characteristics. Typically, you must receive care from health care providers and hospitals within your SNP network, except for in cases when you need emergency or urgent care and when someone who has End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) needs out-of-area kidney dialysis.

How much does Medicaid cost in Minnesota? Full Medicaid coverage is granted to certain qualified patients, while others may be required to pay fees in the forms of deductibles or co-pays for certain Medicaid services. And, while what is covered by Medicaid means little-to-no-cost for beneficiaries, there are some medical services that are considered what is not covered by Medicaid in MN. How much is Medicaid when a health service is not handled by the government? Medicaid cost estimates vary depending on the patient and types of Medicaid insurance… Read More


You’re eligible for Medicare if you’re age 65 or older, receiving disability benefits, or have certain conditions, like end-stage renal disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease). You must be either a United States citizen or a legal permanent resident of at least five years. In some instances, you may not have to take any action in order to enroll. This may happen if you’re turning 65 and already receive Social Security benefits or Railroad Retirement Board benefits.
Medicare offers healthcare coverage to Minnesota residents age 65 or older, or to those Minnesota residents that suffer from certain medical disabilities. In 2016, 882,000 people are enrolled in Medicare in Minnesota, accounting for 16.2% of the population in Minnesota. In 2009 an average of about $8,941 was spent per Medicare enrollee in Minnesota, approximately 13.74% lower than the national average of $10,365. Between 2015 to 2030 the number of seniors in Minnesota is expected to rise by an estimated 54.07% according to calculations based off of the 2000 Census. Thus, the number of Medicare enrollees in the state is also projected to grow.
The question, “Who is eligible for Medicaid?” is a query that Minnesota’s residents want answered. Adults with an income that is 139 percent of the poverty level or below can gain Medical Assistance (MA). MA is the name given to Medicaid in Minnesota. As of June 2016, 1,027,909 people were accepted for Medicaid benefits eligibility in MN, with the uninsured rate decreasing by 39 percent from 2013-2015.
We have worked with two of Minnesota’s most respected health care companies to bring you two new Medicare Advantage plan options for 2019. Our new plans are set up in an accountable care model: an extra level of coordination between these insurers and our health system to ensure quality coverage, great value, and an exceptional experience. Both plans offer two coverage options to give consumers more choice. Learn more about these plans: 

See whether you would prefer a Medicare Advantage plan. Medicare Advantage plans have to offer at least the basic benefits that Original Medicare offers, but some Medicare Advantage plans might also offer coverage for things that Original Medicare doesn’t cover. Use the Medicare Plan Finder to see if there’s a Medicare Advantage plan that meets your needs.
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